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guess america is very rich in shale. >> we are very rich in shale and we're very rich in technology to tap into that shale. >> we're not using it. >> we have -- we're using it in larger and larger ams. what's happened in the united states is we have had a shale gas revolution already with more potential. the technology is good. environmental standards are very high because the industry is making a major effort to ensure that there are no major mistakes that cause problems. so this will do two things. it creates a lot of jobs in this industry but it also lowers the cost of chemicals, it low weeere cost of gas, gasses backing out coal, backing out natural gas that we otherwise would import and otherwise increasing production of petroleum. we used to be dependent on imports of 60 percent of our petroleum and now 40%. potentially an exporter of natural gas, government regulations have to be worked out but we could be exporting natural gas if the right decisions are made to do that. the ams aamounts will obviously depend on certain decisions. no one would have imagined this ten years ago
that these revenues that you seek also come from the creativity of individuals that create technology, the kind of technology that needs to be acquired by the technology industry, for example. also many other sources of revenue. we just want to point out that sometimes the talented scientists and clinicians of the nih feel hampered by some of the policies and rules that come our way. we offer our help in any way that we can to try to work together with you to figure out ways to ensure the maximum creativity of a federal scientists so that the american people can get the most of their investment. >> thank you. we all have to be at the table. we need your input. we have tried to work with the same set of facts. there is 1.2 trillion dollars of tax expenditures, that was a one-year number. the problem we have with sequestration is that it is two trillion over 10 years. the annual tax expenditure number is 10 times that amount. the upper 1% of income earners in this country get about 25% of tax expenditure benefits. so, there is room for changes in our tax code that will be encouraged the type of c
a cover story today on the republicans and their problem with technology and stuart, this quote caught my eye "romney's senior strategist stuart stevens, may well be remembered by historians as the last guy to run a presidential campaign who never tweeted." >> really made -- if i had tweeted in this campaign this whole discussion we've been having about the second amendment would be replaced about the first amendment and whether it should apply to tweeting. listen i don't think that it would be a great mistake if we felt that technology in itself is going to save the republican party. technology is something to a large degree you can go out and purchase and if we think there's an off the shelf solution that you can with the republican party it's wrong. you know, we've had a lot of chance since the campaign to spend time with the obama folks and sometimes they had better technology. some cases we have better technologiment we don't have 140 character problem in the republican party. we have a larger problem that we have to look at and be patient about it. and trying to think that there's o
, the objects addressed in the second amendment inherently evolve with technology. guns today are exceptionally different from guns a hundred years ago, let alone guns at the time of the framing. and in light of the second amendment's peculiarly close relationship with technology, it would make even less sense to be bound solely by history. in his prepared statement, mr. cooper quoted from i think it was chicago v. mcdonald where the court said that the second amendment is like the other amendments. it's subject to a consideration of competing constitutional claims like claims to life, liberty, security and then here's the language, it's knotts to be singed -- it's not to be singled out for special treatment. and i think what mr. cooper is doing is he's elevating the second amendment above all of the other values. of course the court doesn't think that the second amendment should be subject to reevaluation and rejiggering and rebalancing just because we live in the 21st century. but he, as all of the examples that you, i think, carefully enumerated, is clearly open to the idea that a whole rang
as the world changes for his use of technology and empowering social change. he is working on a biography of leonard freed. let us welcome these distinguished guests and one how leonard freed's images of the historic march in august 1963 changed the ongoing worldwide struggle for civil rights. [applause] >> "this is the day," how did this book it started? i say, it was president obama in his first term who said, i am nearer because you all marched. 50 years ago we did, what did i think america was? it was all things to me. my husband home country, my new jewish family, robert and benjamin, leonards cousins, and lots of americans. we came here from amsterdam to photograph the blessed people. i have no photo of myself, of our seven-month stay in america but pictures of her four year old daughter, her grandparents and cousins. leonard was very -- he needed all film for his project. nothing but races he said. i wish i had a picture of myself and of leonard at the march on washington. i only had my eyes. and these eyes looked and looked and looked, i would say, all these faces, and when letter
. .. the new technology would be the answer, but 12 years ago technology had not yet caught up at the station. last year he gave thanks to the production team that pushed themselves to deliver some thing never been done before, a marvelous movie was created. this is another example of why we go to the movies to be astonished into dream as well. it was all of this technology, innovation and creativity, ticket price to consumers has remained remarkably stable over many, many of us, roughly dollars. other than listening to music, watching free tv programming, the most affordable, accessible entertainment is watching a picture inside the state-of-the-art theater. that's why they've told theaters continue to try were people than all theme parks and major sporting event combine. it has never been a better time to be a consumer of movies and television. because it is not up to more people in workplaces want to watch them more times across multiple platforms, the film and television industries innovating to meet that demand. today's movies and television shows can be viewed in theaters on big screens
specialeesed technology and training exemplified the advantages the developed world offered haiti. sensitive microphones, heat-seeking devices and rescue dogs. journalists enshourd audiences would not miss a single survivor being pulled from the rubble. a successful rescue is like an earthquake in reverse. life. the tone of the reporting took on a religious tinge. quote, a new york rescue squad pulled two miracles from the rubble of haiti, led the new york daily is in, at california governor arnold schwarzenegger rashed, quote, many of us were able to watch the california rescuers live on television performing all of these miracles. the first u.s. team to reach haiti was dispatched to u.n. head quarterback and pulled out a bodyguard with minor injuries. ban ki-moon called it a small miracle. an enormous effort targeted the collapsed hotel mt. which had some 200 people inside, mostly foreigners, when it fell. general keene, the head of the u.s. military response would boast, quote, the hotel montana had six teams alone because of the number of people trapped there. the places were ordinary ha
to develop radiation. >> new things have to be sent into space. >> a lot of new things. the technology from that then goes out and stimulate the world economy like apollo and early space programs stimulated the economy of the world. i got an iphone on my hip that has 2000 times the memory of an apollo computer. can you imagine? the space station guys, they have texts, skype or something up there. and they're all on their laptops. it boggles your mind what is going on there technologically. >> today you could probably tweet what is going on on your flight. on your first and only flight, on the way back to earth, you got to do spacewalk. >> it was totally different. a different experience. as i described being on the moon, it contrasts the gray lunar surface with the blackness of space. people ask me what does the earth like from the moon? i said i cannot tell you because i landed in the center of the moon which took the earth directly overhead. in an apollo space suit, it is like being in a fishbowl. you move your head but the helmut does not move. so i did not get to see the earth very much
imagine today. the continuing interest in technology, its free flow with the subject of a book that we reviewed yesterday in "the wall street journal." this particular collection, the whitehead papers, gives us all gathered here today much pride. under the leadership of librarian of congress j. h. billington and with great assistance from chief of the manuscript division and his extraordinary staff, allen koltai tom studs and janice ruse, dr. whitehead, tom's widow has developed a web site containing digitized copies of much of the collection. knowing that there are jams her to be discovered by future generations, she has explored the last and most effective ways to organize the materials and use the semantic descriptions of specific items to assist those who will mind these riches in the years to come. the web site also provides links to other collections containing relevant materials produced by others or by tom's own hand, memos given to others in the course of communication and thus becoming part of their history but where everything will be connected. we are celebrating these new
to spinal injuries. plus? >> the latest warning from technology experts on mobile devices. >> i love how that is the universal i just made a free throw shot. >> whether moving our way, there is still a chance for ice tomorrow. right now it is 32 degrees to the airport, 37 degrees downtown. beautiful blue skies, >> in medical alerts, some promising results in research for spinal injuries. lab rats that were once paralyzed are walking and running again because of ongoing research in switzerland. some of the animals started moving voluntarily after a few weeks of therapy. trials of human patients are expected to begin within the next two years. flu activity continues to decline across the country. 31 states were reporting widespread activity as of friday, down from 38 the week before. western and northeastern states are still experiencing high levels of the flu. more than half the people that need to be hospitalized because of the flu are older than 50. dozens of people took part in a laughter yoga therapy session in venezuela this weekend. participants are encouraged to laugh and watch oth
. with new technologies behind a huge spike in traffic tickets .n rockville it is making roads safer. drivers feel it is over the top. red light tickets are on the rise in rockville. brian stephenson says he has been nabbed twice in the last week. , nearly 18,000 tickets thanissued, twice as many the year before. the price tag for each ticket $75. >> they should enforce the rules and another way. >> police say new technology is increased.for the august, they were capture new violations. drivers can be taken before intersection on a .teady red light have to pay of forgoing ore than 13 miles per hour making a right-hand turn on red. .olice have had complaints they say they are just enforcing the law. police say all violations are -- reviewed before any tickets are sent out. reinventing -- the white house would get how to control gun olence as is president joe needs with officials, one president obama gives .is state of the union address he will push for stricter gun .roll measures developments on the manhunt in california. there is a one million-dollar reward for information that leads to the a
aging and disability technology summit. it was approximately a month ago that secretary kathleen sebelius said the u.s. department of health and human services announced the creation of this new federal agency, and that is the administration for community living. and in her words, she said "for too long, too many americans have faced the a possible choice between moving to an institution or living at home without the long-term services and support they need." so this new administration for community living will be to helping people with disabilities, as well as seniors, to live a productive, satisfying lives. now, as you may be aware, the aging and disability population has been recognized actually at the local and state levels for quite some time now. so the mechanisms for providing support that facility community living have been really brought together into local and state agencies such as the san francisco departments the of aging and adult services that serves those populations since the year 2000. yet, at the federal level, policy developments from a community outreach, and
changing technology are washing away and replacing middle class work. faced with these challenges, the president offers two solutions: more training and more investment in technology to help american workers compete. and there's bipartisan support for that approach. >> going forward the qion will be can we take people with average skills and give them a new technology that makes them earn a lot of money, or can we make our workers more skilled and thus allow them to earn more money. that's going to be the issue. >> reporter: the other issue is scale. the american middle class is vast and so are the challenges facing it. >> the magnitude of the problem facing the middle class-- this disconnect between economic owthnd their prosperity, their opportunities is quite large relative to many of the solutions we're proposing which are on the small side. so we have to ramp up the magnitude of the solutions. >> reporter: which brings us back to where we started. big solutions can be expensive. and that's not popular and may not even be possible given our deficits. darren gersh, "n.b.r.," wa
interested in this issue. specifically, we hope to gain a better understanding of the risk, the technology obstacles, and key research and development efforts being undertaken to overcome the obstacles. uas has garnered a great deal of attention lately. in fact, if you watched the news this morning, there's a lot of -- lot of news about this issue. in january, pbs's "nov a" had a documentary called "rise of the drones," and last week's "time" magazine cover carried the same title, and, of course, the administration's use of drones for targeting terrorists to con cronet our war on terrorism has come to be a central issue in the confirmation hearing of the proposed cia directer, the nominee, john brennan. however, privacy issues and military applications of uas beyond the scope of this hearing. i use the term "unmanned aircraft systems" or usa instead of uas or drones because it is a more complete term. uas are complex systems made up of not just aircraft, but as well as supporting ground, air, and communications infrastructure. uas comes in a variety of shapes and sizes and carries out a wi
of the snake. our road map begins with a hat trick of news out of technology. dell shareholders balking at the buyout price. and apple testing a watch-like device. >> the s&p 500 is up for the first six weeks of the year. something that has not happened since 1971. a big week is ahead as carl mentioned with earnings from coke, cisco, gm, whole foods and michael kors. >> nemo, watch the impact on business, ford at least said it should not have a major impact on february sales. >> the world is reacting to pope benedict's announcement that he will step down at the end of the month citing his advanced age. he's the first pope to resign in almost six centuries. >>> dell defends the buyout in an s.e.c. filing. they said the deal spearheaded by michael dell and private equity firm silver lake partners offers the best value for shareholders. three more of dell's largest investors are joining southeastern asset management. they believe the deal undervalues the company. david, we had this discussion on day one. it's been a while since it's seen $20. but it seems that's what they want. >> the buy
number experience. a collection of innovations designed around a bed with dualair technology that allows you to adjust to the support your body needs - each of your bodies. our sleep professionals will help you find your sleep number setting. exclusively at a sleep number store. sleep number. comfort ... individualized. right now, queen mattresses start at just $599 . and save 50% on our limited edition bed-plus special offers through monday. >> stalled out on tesla's electric highway, that's the headline of the review of the tesla model s a high end electric car designed to drive long distanceses on battery power. the review written by the new york times, john broder who drove from washington to boston. review not so good. driving in cold weather he claimed the battery drained more quickly and drive more slowly and turn down the climate control and had to call the tow company when the car he says died. and the ceo fired back at the review. >> we have the vehicle which have-- do not realize this is a tesla owned vehicle and the log shows when he says he was doing 54 miles per hour, he
, significant action in the event of any further launch using ballistic missile technology or another nuclear test. indeed, we will do so. >> reporter: now it's unclear at this stage what that quote, significant action will amount to but it's most likely, shep, to be a toughening of economic punishment or sanctions as the u.n. likes to call them against the north korean government. >> shep: jonathan, how much closer do they say this activity brings north korea to potentially at least hitting the united states? >> reporter: you remember the rocket launch of north koreans carried out last december. that showed in theory according to the experts that they do have a long-range missile capable of reaching parts of the united states including alaska and hawaii. but the big question here is getting a nuclear weapon small enough that you can mount it on the warhead of such a long-range missile. most experts will tell you the north koreans are at least three years away from being able to master that technology. of course, it's not just about hitting the united states directly. there is also the fear t
$51 million to assist locals in paying for technology transition upgrades in schools across the state a substantial and strategic investment in our schools. [applause] another $34 million is budgeted to address ongoing capital needs that can be used for increased security measures if local officials decide to do so. and more than $35 million is budgeted for teacher salaries. we're also providing $22 million for a new high school for the tennessee school for the deaf in knoxville. our administration's three budgets have certainly supported our commitment to public education, but i also think it's important to note that we're not just throwing money at it. dollars alone don't lead to improvement. there has to be a plan. along with strategic investments, we're pursuing real reform in education that is producing results. we've addressed tenure so that a principal doesn't have to decide after three years to either fire a teacher or grant tenure. there is now a five year time period for the principal to use data more effectively to assess a teacher's performance and then allow time to give
discussion on science, technology, engineering and math. stem, is what we all call it these days. that is the jealousy of all of the other mayers that when they hear about stotterry of mission bay, they are trying to create their own mission bay in their cities and they are wanting to work with all of the universities and the talent because what we have done here, is not only the physical infrastructure, not only creating conditions for businesses to be successful, but we found that we should invest in the very talent that is here and expand on that talent and so it is the noble laurets and the post doctorate students that are here and they are working with people across all of other disciplines, start ups, technology, you hear these great stories and i have seen them myself and we walk in and people no longer using these small microscopes, but they are looking at 3 d technology from auto def and we are looking at cells in three different ways, four different ways, expanding, deepening, all of the science, this is the movement that we have, and this is our new economy and this is
are not necessarily always good at. we have to find ways to combine this with social technology so we have social technical systems up the large corporate level, national community level, and on the very front lines of value creation. i first got involved in this. about national oil policy 30 some odd years ago and i spent some time working for toyota before they brought the system to the united states. i worked in toyota city to help transfer systems to the united states. i have done that over the years. as we went through a process of determining what skills are necessary and it won wonderful consensus is the fact that we need a good education. community colleges are still very important. the one pressure we have as we started working with uaw, general motors, to find the right kind of employees to work in a system was team-based problem solving and this goes back 30 years ago. this is not new. i do not think the equation has changed now that we're bringing a lot of manufacturing back. i think it is a matter of how we have come to understand the cost of living things overseas without understand
apple's road map, for instance. i think you'll hear him talk about how apple thinks about the technology on the back end to try to get an advantage over competitors innovation-wise. he reasonable will be forthcoming how apple thinks about culture and competition. >> comes on a day where jpmorgan writes a big piece on the smartphone industry. they cut qualcomm to neutral, because they say we're getting closer to the slowing smartphone adoption that we expect in 2014. they see it peaking in the next 12 months. >> yeah. those are interesting stats that run somewhat counter to qualcomm's own presentation before analysts just a couple of months ago, i was in san diego for that. i think the real challenge for qualcomm might be competitors like media tech coming in at the low end, trying to sort of come mod tiz android phones. the question is, who's going to get the biggest piece of that pie. >> we'll see a lot of you today, jon. thanks a lot. >> all right. meantime, breaking news on netflix. we'll go to julia boorstin with the details. >> melissa, netflix is partnering with dreamworks animatio
to talk about fiber. there is technology available today where each individual home could be self-sufficient -- self-sufficient with its own energy sell. what is amazing is if we have 500 years of natural gas, there it is. nobody can attack us if every household has energy. we eliminate the grid because everyone has the wrong grade. there is a company in california that is powering e day using methane gas. that company is blue energy of california. host: the president signed an executive order last week regarding cyber security. some news about that, they intended to improve information sharing to establish a framework of cyber security best practices. "the white house spent the last several months crafting the order after congress failed to pass cyber security legislation last year. -- last year." we will talk more about this executive order at 8:30 with larry clinton, president and ceo of the internet security alliance. next, gil, missouri, democratic line. caller: it does not surprise me , an executive order once a month on something. in 1913 they passed a 17th amendment. the s
are embracing technology in their classroom. nearly three-quarters say educational technology helps them to expand on class from content. it makes it easier to bring things down for children. nearly 7% of teachers say they wish to have more classroom technology -- 70%. the pennies are adding up to a big difference. >> it is like draining the family budget with every fill up. sense.oesn't make to it.t feel numkb b >> i have become more frugal. i don't go out to be as much and try to cook more at home. >> higher gas prices can knock our recovery off-track. >> the more people spend on gasoline, the less the have to spend elsewhere. >> we are actually buying less gas than we were years ago. that gas is getting more expensive. >> the average price in 2012 is probably higher than it has been before. >> last year gas took the biggest slice out of the family budget that it did over the past three decades. >> i get mad. i have to get gas. i search for the best gas. >> i am on e. >> it will be in longwall column for you-- a long walk home for you. we have for bloomberg business report. >> warren b
for oil and gas protection? where is the leaders on clean coal technology, which he has talked about for four years. -- gerri: john, let me ask you. i totally agree, but the president is going to say, hey, we have agreed energy agenda where we are making lots of progress. your response? >> the music man promised river city residents of and the law but that never got instruments. i have no problem with green energy, except it cannot deliver what the president says it is going to deliver, and the timeframe that he is talking about. it just -- it is a disturbance. it is unreal, but is not happening in the quantities that are necessary, not because he is not trying. is because the technology is not mature. we cannot produce something for nothing. end of the solar panels today do not have the kind of efficiency that can deliver material energy at an affordable price, the same is true for wind. gerri: we will be talking about solar shortly. a couple of quick questions here are definitely want to get you to. the president last time around mission energy 23 times, one of his favorite things
, and she shared her insights on the direction of new technology. she is the youngest ceo of a fortune 500 company. the world economic forum brings together thousands of liters in business. this is about half an hour. >> welcome to "insight and ideas with marissa mayer." the c.e.o. of yahoo! if i am not mistaken, this is the first such conversation since becoming ceo. >> that's right. >> well, it is an honor for both me and the economic forum. e're here to talk about the future of technology. let's begin with the one nut that no one seems to be able to crack. the platform shift from desktop to mobile. how do you crack that nut? >> it is really important. if you look at what is happening in terms of the shift to mobile, the number of mobile phones has tripled in five years. tablet sales will out-sell laptops this year if predictions hold true. it is really incredibly important. a lot of consumers are making the shift. one is understanding how this works, what this provides. and how we can benefit user expectations. the other piece is monetization. whenever you see a consumer shift of this t
with the top ways to trade, in point technologies associates professor. good to see you. a lot of folks in silicon valley, of course have been talking. the two in to this story, high-end well-trained and low-end. andy grove who is an immigrant from hungary at intel used to talk about this all the time. we need this country and it sun -- silicon valley needs those high-and train entry-level employees. and so i imagine intel would leave one way to trade. >> right. absolutely. a large semiconductor maker, and it needs scientists of the first caliber, and there aren't that many of them in the world. we have a lot of them here in the u.s. a very good educational system, but also very smart people outside the country, and we would like to employ a pretty much everyone of those the we can get. liz: what is your assumption about what immigration reform would apply? perhaps we back a little bit and look at that and start to figure out where you feel the real stock price are. >> if you look at immigration reform, there are two elements to it that people care about lot. one of them is the high ski
backward. [ engine turns over, tires squeal ] and you'll find advanced safety technology like an available heads-up display on the 2013 lexus gs. there's no going back. >>> let's take a walk -- or shall i say a hike down memory lane. remember mark sanford? the former governor of south carolina? a strong conservative. a force in the gop. the guy who was talked about for president. but let's be honest. he's really best-known for his bizarre disappearing act in the summer of 2009. for six days, the media, his family and his wife were wondering where he was. sanford told his wife he was hiking the appalachian trail. but, soon after, he came clean. >> you see, the bottom line is this. i've been unfaithful to my wife. i developed a relationship with a dear, dear friend. it started innocently, which i'm sure many of these things do. i would also apal jazz to my staff. >> but now he's going from the appalachian trail to the campaign trail. he's running for tim scott's vacated house seelt. today, he released his first campaign ad. >> more recently, i've experienced how none of us go through life wi
can spend less time... yea, the golden barrels... managing wireless costs and technology and more time driving your business potential. looks like we're going to need to order more agaves... ah! oh! ow! ... and more bandages. that's powerful. shareable data plus unlimited talk and text. now save $50 on a droid razr maxx hd by motorola. did you just turn your ringer off so no one would interrupt and.us?one. oh no, i... just used my geico app to get a tow truck. it's gonna be 30 minutes. oh, so that means that we won't be stuck up here, for hours, with nothing to do. oh i get it, you wanna pass the time, huh. (holds up phone) fruit ninja!!! emergency roadside assistance. just a click away with the geico mobile app. it's lots of things. all waking up. connecting to the global phenomenon we call the internet of everything. ♪ it's going to be amazing. and exciting. and maybe, most remarkably, not that far away. we're going to wake the world up. and watch, with eyes wide, as it gets to work. cisco. tomorrow starts here. >>> 50 years after the assassination of john f. kennedy, piece of the
. >> there's no stopping this technology. anyone who thinks they can put this jeanne back in the-- genie back in the box, that's silliness. >> reporter: for years, military has used unmanned aircraft in hot spots. >> reporter: war technology is now coming home, from highways to your neighborhood, thousands of drones are doing everything from keeping an eye on the weather to helping police keep an eye on you. >> you have men and women that are looking at monitors that are providing control signals, through the network, to antennas on the unmanned vehicle. >> reporter: this is the patuxent river unmanned vehicle. wjz gained access to this secure facility, where cutting- edge drones are put to the test. the massive plane you see is controlled remotely, only by train operators on the ground. again, no pilot is inside, through a series of sensors and satellites. >> turn left, turn right. climb, descend, turn on a camera, turn off a camera. >> reporter: they also track storms, like hurricane sandy, flying at high altitudes for very long times, measuring th
to grow every decade in america on the order of 25-55% a decade. our technology stock in manufacturing was doubled it in the 2000s it was zero essentially. which has never again happen in our history. the u.s. companies were not investing in automation initiatives. and secondly, we have this in her recent book, if you look at the share of corporate r&d as applied, excuse because basic, applied in development, we are the only industrial nation where the share of the corporate share in basic and applied to shrink in the last decade. every other country is expand their basic and applied for u.s. companies to the opposite. they expanded their development although that is flattened and their shrank. largely that's really, really risky, and shareholders are saying we really don't care about returned. and seven years we want returns next you. any other component of that is when you have the 27th weakest and most anemic tax critics of the tax code doesn't really rewarding. and alas, al all the great worke did at mit, we are actually nowhere near the lead in funding university research. we're 2
docked at the international space station in record time. new digital steering technology enabled the unpiling craft to complete the journey from earth in just six hours. >> it is to take two days -- imagine that. the vessel was carrying almost 3 tons of supplies including fuel, scientific equipment, and a culinary specialty -- smoked sausages with cheese and garlic at the special request of the station's three russian crew members. >> sounds like they had a feast. >> we have to take a short break. back in a minute. stay tuned. >> welcome back. u.s. president barack obama will deliver the annual state of the union address in just a few hours in washington. he will set out his plans for a second term in office. >> north korea's nuclear plant is likely to top his plan of foreign policy issues, but domestically, he also has a host of policies to address from immigration to climate change to gun legislation. >> note issue will get as much attention as the economy. unemployment is still high and almost 8%, and while there have been some encouraging signs of recovery, many americans are
assessment of the climb. there have been problems and early technology often has a lot of problems and there are naysayers and people tell us why we shouldn't do it and too expensive. and early computers. ang you can still be subjective about it. >> we'll keep an eye on it. there's more news watch ahead. if you see something that you feel shows evidence of media bias, tweet us. up next, did the media interfere in a massive manhunt? >> a major manhunt for a rogue ex-cop gets major media attention. did the press get too close to the action? and did some in the media side with the killererererer hi. hi. i'm here to pick up some cacti. it should be under stephens. the verizon share everything plan for small business. get a shareable pool of data... got enough joshua trees? ... on up to 25 devices. so you can spend less time... yea, the golden barrels... managing wireless costs and technology and more time driving your business potential. looks like we're going to need to order more agaves... ah! oh! ow! ... and more bandages. that's powerful. sharble data plus unlimited talk and text.
just acquired $24 million. media will be second. third will be technology. we have seen the top ten most active buyers. number one, facebook. number four, twitter. number three, groupon. not in the same dollar volume size. dagen: some of these small deals, they are doing it for the talent. they will snap up some of these. >> it is called an aqua higher. dagen: seen it time and again. that is the job market you want to be in. sam, thank you very much. fear and spending concerns that we are only years away from becoming greece. you have heard that before. now it is on the cover. tax dollars going to america's new stadiums. we are live in their water, florida. rich: we are at spring training. government dollars, taxpayers, major league baseball, we will have it all coming up. ♪ dagen: when it comes to our nation that, following president obama's plan to put the united states on a path to becoming worst off than greece in 22 years, this is according to a recent barron's article. we have two guests with us today. i am not biased based on the origin of where i came from. ladies, it is g
devices. so you can spend less time... yea, the golden barrels... managing wireless costs and technology and more time driving your business potential. looks like we're going to need to order more agaves... ah! oh! ow! ... and more bandages. that's powerful. sharble data plus unlimited talk and text. now save $50 on a droid razr maxx hd by motorola. ♪ ♪ >> brian: a guest of president obama's "state of the union" address three years ago. helped take down terrorists whistswho take down terrorist at fort hood. they confronted major hasan who is still on trial and getting paid. she says the president promised her that she and other victims would receive the best care and support. what about a medal? today, she is out of a job and feels like the president did not keep his word. >> not in the least little bit has the victims been taken care of. in fact, they have been neglected badly. >> so the president's promise was not fulfilled? >> no. >> if i were to see him again, again, it's not about me, but i would beg him to please take care of -- >> brian: it is staggering to me, kimberly, that
research and technology to shift cars and trucks off oil for good. >> my administration will keep cutting red tape and speeding up new oil and gas permits. >> it would be a change in policy since the obama administration has been steadily reducing them. >> in the past four years the leases offshore has gone down 46%. >> 96% of the boom and production is private land. in north dakota, for instance, the unemployment rate is 3.2% in part because it acts so much faster than the administration. >> it takes ten days to get a permit to drill in north dakota. 307 days on average for government land. >> if it moves factor, critics see huge job potential. >> we would have $2 million more jobs -- 2 million more jobs in 30 years. >> both sides are concerned it didn't mention the keystone xl pipeline last night, issue that commits environmental from some unions that say keystone xl creates 20,000 high-paying jobs. >> those are shovel ready jobs. all he has to do is pencil in his signature and they will go to work. >> the president did give a nod to environmentalists, promising to act on what he descri
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